L5R WAY OF THE SAMURAI PDF

Zolotaxe Strategy is nothing more than deception, and the truth will be revealed at the end in the killing. Some simple katas available to most clans have a very low price in terms of XP, but have a penalty in addition to the bonus. This invaluable resource details each Clan Bushido School: Boardgame counters are punched, unless noted. More extreme failures, such as a violent outburst, an attack or serious insult against someone of higher station, or a breach of duty or loyalty, are punished much more severely. A samurai who openly insults others is showing his own weakness, which is why Rokugani courtiers endlessly practice the art of the subtle and indirect insult. That way, when it is time to draw the blade the mind will do it automatically.

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Some would even like to claim honor from this activity, even as they make tremendous personal gain. The natural form of patronage followed almost everywhere else is for a samurai to provide protection to the peasants who work and live upon his land, in return for his rightful taxes.

This elegant system has become corrupted in an urban setting where there is a large transient population and large numbers of merchants in close proximity to each other — each potentially under the protection of a different family or samurai. It would be absurd for a Crab village to decide it wanted the protection of the Phoenix instead; however, in a city, it becomes possible for a merchant or craftsman to leave the protection of one samurai for the patronage of another. It is impossible, however, to go from having a patron to having no patron, except under highly unusual circumstances such as the death of a patron with no heir.

In cities, then, and especially in Ryoko Owari, it is common for merchants to actively solicit the patronage of a samurai or family. Families and samurai, in turn, may now pick and choose who they support — for support of a vassal involves some risk on the part of the samurai as explained below , and the samurai of Ryoko Owari are most interested in getting the greatest return of profit from their investment of time, money and effort.

In return for this financial boon, the patron is expected to protect the vassal physically, legally and financially. The patron is expected to protect the vassal from extortion, and if the business requires it furnish protection for caravans.

Finally, the samurai is expected to protect the person of the merchant and his family, just as a country samurai protects his villages from bandits. So far, this sounds somewhat similar to the protection offered a village by its lord. The difference, however, lies in proximity and competition. Since the city samurai is much closer to his merchants and craft workers than a country samurai, it is natural for the urban noble to take a keener interest in the operations that receive his protection.

Soon, the samurai is making suggestions to his vassals — then asking questions — and before long his entire attention is absorbed by commerce, instead of being concerned with honor, duty and those studies proper to his class. Thus we see the noble samurai of Rokugan reduced to the level of merchant shills in a marketplace. This has happened throughout Ryoko Owari. Some samurai are content to leave such matters to those of proper station, but the great majority of Ryoko Owari samurai take a direct and controlling interest in the businesses of their vassals.

Instead of hunting, praying or practicing arms, the Ryoko samurai spends his days haggling, gathering money, and making loans. The corruption of the spirit this engenders is slow, but its results are clearly visible to any outsider. Bad enough that our samurai are developing a commercial attitude, but the competition for prized artisans adds another level of tension and dishonor. A silversmith for example whose works are prized may decide to change patrons — leaving the employ of one samurai for another who may for example require a lesser tithe.

If the new patron has greater political influence or martial skill there is little the former patron can do about it. The result is a grotesque inversion of the social order. Instead of commanding heimin; the samurai are reduced to placating them and seeking their favor, instead of the other way around. Supposedly they are protected by the Governor, to whom they pay some taxes; yet they certainly receive far less attention from the Thunder Guard than those who are patronized directly by the Shosuro family.

Criminals perceive such merchants as easy prey, and this perception is accurate. Ronin merchants have come to me with complaints and begged for my protection, but if I were to protect one, soon all of them would expect the intervention of an Emerald Magistrate, leaving me no time for my real duties.

I refused them. Instead they turn to their local firemen, asking for protection from threats other than careless blazes. They offer bribes, and in return the firemen act as bodyguards and hired muscle. This mitigates the problem of crimes against merchants, but it adds, again, to a perception that the magistrates both those of the Governor and those of the Emperor cannot cope with crime.

A final danger — possibly the greatest threat — is still in the potential stage. In my tenure as magistrate, two samurai attempted to get permission from the Governor to duel, because one had killed the merchant vassal of the other. It came out that the merchant had formerly been a vassal of the samurai who killed her; her new master claimed that the killing had been a cowardly and indirect attack on him by a samurai afraid to face him directly.

Hyobu refused to countenance the duel, and both samurai lost face; but I fear that if one had been from her own clan, she would have allowed the duel. A precedent of samurai dueling over merchants is not one I am anxious to see established in any city.

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Way of the Samurai

Gojin The effects of a kata can be ended by the user at will. The samurai kneels and makes three cuts across his belly, disemboweling ths. It is intelligent and strong. For example, if you use the Lion clan kata Gentle Blade of Winter inflicts a -1 penalty to attack rolls their an opponent every time the character inflicts damage upon the opponent. Those who stray from this path will perish.

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L5R WAY OF THE SAMURAI PDF

Some would even like to claim honor from this activity, even as they make tremendous personal gain. The natural form of patronage followed almost everywhere else is for a samurai to provide protection to the peasants who work and live upon his land, in return for his rightful taxes. This elegant system has become corrupted in an urban setting where there is a large transient population and large numbers of merchants in close proximity to each other — each potentially under the protection of a different family or samurai. It would be absurd for a Crab village to decide it wanted the protection of the Phoenix instead; however, in a city, it becomes possible for a merchant or craftsman to leave the protection of one samurai for the patronage of another. It is impossible, however, to go from having a patron to having no patron, except under highly unusual circumstances such as the death of a patron with no heir. In cities, then, and especially in Ryoko Owari, it is common for merchants to actively solicit the patronage of a samurai or family.

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Edit The word "samurai" means "those who serve", and was was first used by Emperor Hantei in reference to the Seven Thunders before the Day of Thunder. Female samurai were referred to as samurai-ko. The daisho consisted of a set of two blades, a wakizashi and a katana , tucked into an obi. Only true samurai would carry such weapons, and any individual caught carrying or touching a daisho without permission would be executed. Charges brought against a samurai from a lower caste were generally ignored unless the samurai wished to acknowledge them. This did not mean that a samurai was always immune to punishment.

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