HAROLD CRUSE CRISIS OF THE BLACK INTELLECTUAL PDF

The moment passed, but Cruse, a black cultural nationalist, was not just a footnote to history. In "The Crisis," Cruse urged black intellectuals and artists to establish their own institutions and reclaim black American culture from those who sought to appropriate it. It meant we could make an intervention, implicitly political, for our people, and by teaching we could make a direct contribution to the broader struggle for rights for the African-American people," Gates said. A famously curmudgeonly autodidact and the son of a railway porter, Cruse grew up in New York City.

Author:Mojinn Malazahn
Country:Lebanon
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Education
Published (Last):10 June 2011
Pages:439
PDF File Size:14.83 Mb
ePub File Size:9.52 Mb
ISBN:736-2-36452-444-3
Downloads:39657
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Vudotaxe



The moment passed, but Cruse, a black cultural nationalist, was not just a footnote to history. In "The Crisis," Cruse urged black intellectuals and artists to establish their own institutions and reclaim black American culture from those who sought to appropriate it.

It meant we could make an intervention, implicitly political, for our people, and by teaching we could make a direct contribution to the broader struggle for rights for the African-American people," Gates said. A famously curmudgeonly autodidact and the son of a railway porter, Cruse grew up in New York City. He never finished college, and was among the first blacks to receive tenure at an American university without a college degree.

Many black intellectuals said they learned as much from the example of Cruse as from his writing. But Cruse reserved special venom for Jews. In "The Crisis," he asserted that "the great brainwashing of Negro radical intellectuals was not achieved by capitalism, or the capitalistic bourgeoisie, but by Jewish intellectuals in the American Communist Party. When the book was published, reviewers tended to ignore its anti-Semitism. Like so many disillusioned former Communists, Cruse retained a dogmatic, dated writing style.

One of his most damning adjectives is "bourgeois," an epithet he assigned liberally, to, among others, the N. Martin Luther King Jr. But on practical, if not ideological, grounds he was no more forgiving of African-American nationalists who refused to ally themselves with white groups.

Indeed, some see Cruse as a crucial figure in the shift away from integration and toward black separatism. He was "an exemplar of a new kind of separatist ideology.

Stokely Carmichael was on the news, Amiri Baraka was writing furious poems, but Cruse was behind the scenes," McWhorter added. An unsuccessful playwright and novelist who founded the Black Arts Theater and School in Harlem with LeRoi Jones later Amiri Baraka , Cruse was particularly harsh on black literary and cultural figures.

He attacked James Baldwin for trying too hard to please whites. However ornery such opinions were, many found them liberating.

For Jonathan Holloway, a professor of African-American studies at Yale University, "it was the boldness of his gesture and the scope of his examination that made the book immediately important" in spite of its flaws. He eagerly bought the rights to "The Crisis," which its publisher, William Morrow, had let go out of print. Gates recalled being assigned the book in three different classes as an undergraduate in The sources included The Messenger, the magazine A.

Even as Cruse faded from view, his ideas were absorbed into the larger culture. Today, African-American studies programs are thriving.

CIUDAD JARDIN EBENEZER HOWARD PDF

Harold Cruse, The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual, and 1967’s Intellectual Crisis

Cruse became interested in the arts as a young man, thanks in large measure to his close relationship with an aunt who often took him to shows on the weekend. Army and served in Europe and north Africa. In Cruse joined the Communist Party for several years. Maxwell noted on page of his book F. Eye that "Harold Cruse" was "recruited as an undercover Communist Party informant he proved willing to name names of onetime co-members, but nothing more. Many believed Cruse was an opponent of "integration" which he referred to as "assimilation" because its policies were only geared towards integrating blacks into white society and not whites into black; betraying an inherent unacceptability of blackness in mainstream America.

EXSANGUINO TRANSFUSION PDF

40 Years of 'The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual'

.

Related Articles